Boulevard Theatre Review

London, 03-06-2020

Located in buzzing Soho’s Walker’s Court, a narrow 18th century street that is famous for its association with sex trade, Boulevard is a modern venue that feels chic, sophisticated, and youthfully playful.

Its entrance appears discrete in comparison to its flashy neighbouring theatres. However, on entering the building it is evident that there is tasteful drama to be found throughout its interior design.

The staircase is an interesting contrast to the traditional overly worn red carpeted steps that comes to mind when you think of West End theatres.

Soft lighting and a staircase made of continuous strips of rolled brass lead us to the restaurant. The staircase is an interesting contrast to the traditional overly worn red carpeted steps that comes to mind when you think of West End theatres. Our journey continues across a glazed bridge, with striking views of Walker’s Court’s neon lights, towards the lobby and restaurant. There are soft pinks and rich blues which illuminate the space and our eyes excitingly wandered over the beautiful detailed seating and striking standing arrangements.

 

Contemporary and sensual art prints are clustered within art deco inspired mouldings, well balanced by a rich velvet banquette. The furniture is delicate, comfortable and well designed. It is refreshing to see how they have handled art deco, abstracting and reinterpreting it into its modern setting, with elements of the design resonating feminine sensuality.

The competent staff guide us through the extensive wine list, a la carte menu and the narrative-filled cocktail menu, which is inspired by the New York setting of the play we were here to see, ‘The Sunset Limited.’

We start with a few tasty small plates, moving onto salmon with chilli kale, beetroot sauce and pink fir potatoes for our mains. All are mouth-watering and beautifully presented, perfectly paired with the waiter’s recommendation of white wine. The atmosphere in the restaurant is exceptionally pleasant striking the balance between vibrant and intimate.

In contrast to the restaurant, the theatre has a feel of retro-futurism, with violet light washing down the walls.

We sit on stunning bespoke timber chairs upholstered in leather with carved wood armrests. They are probably the most comfortable theatre chairs we have ever sat on. Happily, there seems to be no bad place to sit in the theatre, due to the seating’s concentric layout. The theatre breaths modernity whilst respecting the age-old traditions of performance spaces. Importantly for us it feels intimate and personal.